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Possibly the first labels we have featured from the Ashwell Brewery; this pair of Special Brown Ale labels needs little introduction and we are unlikely to find a reason for the variation.

I know we only featured a pair of Pale Ale labels from the South London Brewery quite recently, but I have just stumbled across this pair. Same beer but I guess slightly later examples. I can’t even begin to guess what might have prompted this very minor change.

I have to admit, this is another pair that I didn’t know existed. Another thank you to Nick for sending the images in. If only more members had the time and energy to send in their ‘finds’. The question these two Strong Ale labels raises is: ‘ why? ‘

The thing that I love abut ‘Spot the Difference’ is the times one of our members sends in images of labels with a difference that I hadn’t seen before. I have received a couple recently from Nick and here is the second. A label I would be unlikely to look at twice, except now I know what I am looking for. If it wasn’t for the fact that it should be the same colour as much of the rest of the label, I would assume they just forgot that colour.

The question ‘Has it been trimmed?’ was much more relevant for this pair of Brown Ale labels from the City Brewery, Exeter because, as far as I know, it is the only perfectly rectangular label they produced; unless you know differently. Careful measurement has ensured we know it is not a trimmed version of the usual label.

Many collectors have worried about the exact differences between rounded corners and right angled corners. After all it is possible to accurately trim a rounded corner labels to appear to be quite different. This pair of Angus Pale labels from Dundee are genuine differences, there are a number of pairs in existence and precise location of one on top of the other reveals that it is impossible to trim the rounded corners to form the other label. Thanks to Nick for sending in the images.

 

I love this pair. Sadly, it is not part of my collecting era, but it doesn’t stop me appreciating the difference between these two Bitter Ale labels from Wales. Thanks to Eric for sending the images, at first I thought it was just a deeper blue with identical font and design, but then I saw it!!

Sometimes the differences between different labels were due to a design update or simply a desire to improve the look of the label. There doesn’t appear to be any change in the M & R Export Pale Ale, but the font at the bottom looks different. However, the most significant change is in the dock scene which looks so much sharper in the label on the left. Thanks to Eric for sending the images.

I don’t think we have featured labels from Webster’s Brewery in this series, so here are two Velvet Stout labels from the late 1940s and early 1950s. I leave it to you to work out the earlier. You can almost hear the conversations ‘we’ve got a full stop, why do you think it needs a comma as well?’ Note also the different ampersands. The label on the left has had a bit of damage, I have been looking in vain for a replacement for some time. I guess a few of you will be checking your albums.

 

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