International Society of Label Collectors & British Brewery Research
  
  
  

Bushell, Watkins, Smith Ltd

The Black Eagle Brewery was founded around 1840 and registered as B.C.Bushell and Co Ltd in 1894.

W.F.Watkins & Son operated the Swan Brewery in Westerham.

The Sevenoaks Brewery was founded in 1830 and was known as Alfred Smith & Co. 

The company became Bushell, Watkins Ltd in 1897 and Bushell, Watkins & Smith Ltd in 1899 as a result of two mergers. Brewing was concentrated at the Black Eagle Brewery. The company was acquired in 1948 by Taylor Walker of Limehouse when 102 public houses were owned. Brewing continued until 1965.

 

Kent Bitter Ale 1920s

Cooper 1920s

Dinner Ale 1920s

Dinner Ale 1930s

Audit Ale 1920s

Audit Ale 1930s

Audit Ale 1940s

Family Stout 1930s

Brown Ale 1930s

Brown Ale 1940s

Double Stout 1930s

Double Stout 1940s

Light Ale 1930s

Light Ale 1940s

Pale Ale 1920s

Pale Ale 1930s

Pale Ale 1940s

Special Pale Ale 1940s

Stout 1930s

Stout 1940s

Winter Ale 1930s

Winter Ale 1940s

Stopper labels

Guinness post 1936

Guinness 1940s

Guinness 1940s a

Coronation Ale 1953

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3 Responses to Bushell, Watkins, Smith Ltd

  • A superb set. First time visit today. And on the day you made a million. Congratulations. Brendan

  • Do next labels appear on their own or in conjunction with another, larger, label. If so, what was the purpose of the neck label?

  • Hi Charlie D
    Not quite sure what your question means but I will try to give a bit of info.
    The ‘main label’ or ‘body label’ usually contains all of the principle info on the product & its producer.
    The ‘back label’ is generally an extension of the main label so as to allow for additional info for which there is otherwise no space for.
    The ‘neck label’ can be used for additional info or to a distinction to the bottle for more shelf appeal.
    The ‘stopper label’ became prominent when regulation required protection against underage drinking in 1909 when it was common for adults to send there children to buy beer. The then common screw top capped bottles were easy to open & reseal with a simple twist. It seems the youth would open the bottles and take a sip then reseal so as not to be detected. The stopper label prevented this.
    Hope that answers your question but if not come back with additional questions.
    Cheers
    Dale

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