International Society of Label Collectors & British Brewery Research
  
  
  

Beer labels: Spot the difference #15

Always good to get a response to questions about beer labels. Thank you Steve for the information on the Harman’s differences. Images would be most welcome. Maybe other members/visitors to the site can help on any others. Our next spot the difference features Duncan Gilmour’s Extra Stout. No help on this, but I have thought for many years that the label on the left was the earlier issue, but reference to Richard Percival’s Brewery Tray website dates this style to the 1920s, which is a good 25 years before I believed it was introduced. Perhaps the label on the left is the post-war issue. Comments expected.

 

Gilmour

Over the last couple of weeks, images have been added to the Mansfield Brewery Co and John J Hunt sections of our Featured Breweries. Thanks to John T and Chris B for sending in the images.

Also labels from the Chester Northgate Brewery have been added. Have a look, there are not that many different labels for that brewery as yet.  And I am still waiting for the additional images for Wells of Watford. 

Peter

Details of the April Postal Auction have been mailed to all members. If there are any members who would like the full colour versions of the black and white pages they have received, please contact myself either by email or through this website.

To whet non members appetites, some of the more interesting labels will be uploaded to the site very soon. But remember you do need to be a member of the Society to bid on the labels. Please do not ask members to bid for you, because they will almost certainly refuse.  Yes it is a blatant attempt to boost membership, and yes there are some benefits for a modest outlay.

As a start, I am sure this label will attract a great deal of interest. Closing date for bids is 26th April. And don’t forget you have to be a member to win it..

Page & Overton

Beer labels: Spot the difference #14

A big thank you to Phil for providing images of these two IPA beer labels from John Thompson’s Bell Brewery, Studley in Warwickshire.  Always good to know that there are members out there with scanning facilities who are prepared to take the time to send in their images. If there was any interest out there I could dig out some more labels from this brewer to add it to the featured brewery section.

Thompson Studley

Size Really Matters #6

Three Cheltenham and Hereford Breweries Chelt Ale for quart, pint and half pint bottles.  The labels are 97mm, 79mm and 70mm tall and were in use in the 1950s until the merger with the Stroud Brewery Co. in 1958 to form West Country Breweries. If these labels are sold on an internet website, you can see why an accurate description including the size of the label is necessary, and a scrap of a tape measure may not give the full picture.Cheltenham & Hereford

Spot the difference #13

An opportunity to feature both a spot the difference and a size matters using three labels from Frederick Robinson’s Unicorn Brewery in Stockport. These are the earlier and later versions of the Light Dinner Ale. I believe the earlier one was in use in the 1930s and the later in the 1950s. A small label just 63mm tall and probably used for both the half pint and pint bottles.Robinson 3

Size Really Matters #4

I am really pleased with this response.  So much so, that I will add another now instead of waiting until tomorrow. Here are two Nut Brown Ale labels from John Richdale of Sheffield. The half pint label is 68mm tall and the pint is 89mm tall. These are probably in the last series issued before the takeover by Hammonds United Breweries in 1956.Richdale

Size Really Matters #2

Three comments!!! Must be a record. So here are the pint and half pint labels for Chesters Extra Stout. The pint label is 84mm tall and the half pint 66mm. I believe these labels were in use in the 1950s.

I can remember waiting on in the Swan Hotel at Weaste some years ago. It was Threlfalls Bitter and Chesters ‘Fighting Mild’.Chesters